Farms for the Future Registration

Learn more about the series and register below

All five workshops will be tailored to Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont for state-specific experts to discuss the nuances of their state. Workshops will also feature regional experts and professionals in the field, including farmers, planners, land trusts, policy makers, scientists, and land justice advocates. Workshops will be highly interactive and limited to 30 people to facilitate networking and dialogue. 

 

Workshop topics:

  • Supporting and Sustaining Farms, Farmers, and Farmland in your Community
  • Strategies and Tools for Farm Protection
  • Solar Siting and Farmland: Siting Options and Considerations
  • Strategies and Tools for Making Farmland Available to Farmers
  • Tools and Resources for Supporting Black, Indigenous, and Farmers of Color in Your Community

Scroll down for more information on each.

*To foster networking, we ask that you make every effort to attend and to inform the organizers if you find that you will be unable to attend after you’ve registered.*

 

Supporting and Sustaining Farms, Farmers, and Farmland in your Community

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This workshop is the first in a five-part series and serves as a broad overview to the workshops that follow it, which will dig into specific tools and resources in greater depth. 

This workshop will provide a holistic overview to the challenges and opportunities facing northern New England’s farms and farmers and share principles and tools land trusts, municipalities, and other practitioners can use to develop more farm-friendly communities. While participants may attend any of the workshops individually, we strongly encourage participation in this framing workshop (or to watch the webinar recording) prior to participation in the other modules.

Core speakers include: Julia Freedgood– American Farmland Trust and Stephanie Morningstar– Northeast Farmers of Color Land Trust.

State specific contributors: Nancy Everhart– Vermont Housing and Conservation Board, Ellen Griswold– Maine Farmland Trust, Amy Manzelli– BCM Environmental and Land Law, and Jon Ramsay– Center for an Agricultural Economy.

Photo credit: Lance Cheung- USDA

Strategies and Tools for Farm Protection

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Part two in the five-part series, this workshop will provide an overview of farmland protection tools.

Land trusts, municipalities, and non-profit organizations play essential roles in protecting the agricultural land base in northern New England. Building off of the series’ first workshop, “Supporting & Sustaining Farms, Farmers, and Farmland in your Community,” this workshop will provide an overview of farmland protection strategies that communities can use to protect farmland. Tools such as conservation easements, tax incentives, and funding mechanisms will be discussed. Participants will also learn about “beyond conservation” tools and partnerships that can be used to further protect farms for farmers and foster more equitable, resilient, farm-friendly communities.

Core speakers include: Adam Bishop– Maine Farmland Trust, and Stephanie Morningstar– Northeast Farmers of Color Land Trust.

State specific contributors include: Nancy Everhart- Vermont Housing & Conservation Board, Jeremy Lougee– Southeast Land Trust of New Hampshire, and Brett Sykes– Maine Farmland Trust.

Photo credit: John Piotti

Solar Siting and Farmland: Siting Options and Considerations

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Part three in the five-part series, this workshop will provide an overview of best practices for solar siting around farmland.

Climate change and loss of agricultural land to non-farming uses threaten New England agriculture. Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont all have state-based renewable energy goals and farmland protection goals. This workshop will provide an overview of smart solar siting principles, examples of co-locating solar on farmland, best management practices that enhance conservation outcomes, and solar and conservation easement compatibility. We’ll share examples of solar projects on farmland and discuss ways that towns and cities can adopt policies and practices to promote a balanced approach to solar developments while retaining and protecting agricultural land.

Core speakers include: Emily Cole, Ph.D.– American Farmland Trust and Jake Marley– Hyperion Systems, LLC.

State specific contributors include: Alex DePillis–  Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food & Markets, Ellen Griswold– Maine Farmland Trust, Lexie Hain- Agrivoltaic Solutions LLC., Alex Metzger– Monadnock Conservancy, Madeleine Mineau– Clean Energy NH, and Tyler Miller- Vermont Land Trust.

Photo credit Emily Cole Ph.D

Strategies and Tools for Making Farmland Available to Farmers

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Part four in the five-part series, this workshop will provide an overview of land access for new and beginning farmers.

Affordable and secure access to land are significant barriers for the future of agriculture in northern New England. Land trusts, municipalities, and non-profit support organizations have powerful roles to play in helping farmers find, access, and be successful on farmland. This workshop will help registrants better understand the needs of diverse farm seekers and provide examples of strategies and tools municipalities and land trusts can use to promote farm access in their communities—including examples of creative partnerships and models that promote greater equity.

Core speakers include: Shemariah Blum-Evitts- Land for Good, Christine Hutchinson and Stephanie Morningstar – Northeast Farmers of Color Land Trust

State specific contributors include: Land for Good’s Field Agents Cara Cargill (NH), Mike Ghia (VT) , and Abby Sadauckas (ME), Bo Dennis– MOFGA, Maggie Donin– Vermont Land Trust, Jeremy Lougee– Southeast Land Trust of New Hampshire, Jameson Small– ORIS/ Fresh Start Farms, Sam Smith– Intervale Center, and Nina Young– Maine Farmland Trust.

Photo credit: Lance Cheung/ USDA

Tools and Resources for Supporting Black, Indigenous, and Farmers of Color in Your Community

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Part five in the five-part series, this workshop will provide an overview of needs of BIPOC farmers and strategies for becoming stronger allies

Many municipalities, land trusts, and non-profits working to support local farms and farmers are becoming increasingly aware of the inequities that Black, Indigenous, and People of Color, or BIPOC, face around the issue of land. Stephanie Morningstar, director of the Northeast Farmers of Color Land Trust, will delve into the historical context of land dispossession and racial inequities that BIPOC farmers face in northern New England. Registrants will learn about the needs of BIPOC farmers and strategies for becoming stronger allies to BIPOC farmers and advancing equity-based land access partnerships and projects in your communities. First-hand stories, case studies, tools, and resources for engaging in this work will be shared. We encourage both those interested in this topic and those who are still questioning the relevancy of this topic in their work to participate in this workshop.

Core speakers include: Stephanie Morningstar– Northeast Farmers of Color Land Trust’s (NEFOC) Director, with Christine Hutchinson from NEFOC’s Board of Directors and others.

Photo courtesy of Northeast Farmers of Color Land Trust